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There are plenty of motels and hotels on Route 66 in Arizona. But a select few really kick it up a notch in the “atmosphere” department. If you’re taking a road trip in Arizona and you want the full “get your kicks” experience, check out one of these motels and hotels on Route 66 in Arizona.

Some motels have a vintage homey charm, where you half-expect someone’s grandma to pour you a cup o’ joe. Others are more traditional motels that have really taken the Route 66 theme seriously, with giant murals and lots of neon. A few are vintage buildings that have been converted to charming inns. One hotel on Route 66 is a luxury property that dates back to the mother road’s earliest days . . . when taking the train was as popular as a road trip! And then there are the tepees . . .

All of these motels and hotels on Route 66 in Arizona are on (or very near) Old Route 66. So when staying here, you can immerse yourself in that old midcentury experience of taking a classic American Road Trip!

Two 1950s classic cars parked in front of the Wigwam motel

The motels are listed from east to west below:

Motels on Route 66 in Holbrook, Arizona

Holbrook is the easternmost town on Route 66 in Arizona where there are cool retro places to stay. This town is about 20 miles west of Petrified Forest National Park and The Painted Desert. That makes Holbrook a great place to stay if you want to spend time exploring those two magnificent parks.

Brad’s Desert Inn

Front of Brads Desert Inn motel, painted mustard yellow with neon signs and cowboy motif out front

Rated 8.4/10 on Booking.com

Brad’s Desert Inn is retro-chic with modern touches. This classic Route 66 motel was purchased by Peter Schmidt, an Austrian with hotel management experience who loves the American west 🤠. The outside is painted desert gold, and bedecked with all sorts of western paraphernalia. The rooms have thematic touches, such as full wall murals of trains or desert scenes, and cozy western blankets.

Reserve on Booking.com

The Wigwam Motel

antique cars in front of kitschy teepee motel rooms route 66 holbrook arizona

Rated 4.5/5 on Google

The uber-retro Wigwam has been family-owned and operated by the Lewis family since it was built in 1950. The rooms are in concrete tepees (not wigwams, go figure), and furnished with updated updated western-style hickory furniture. Classic cars parked outside of each unit give you that “midcentury feel,” even if you’re driving a boring old rental car. Reserve direct with the hotel: 928-524-3028.

Looking for other places to stay in Holbrook? Check all hotels and compare prices across booking sites with Hotels Combined.

Hotels on Route 66 in Arizona: Winslow

Long before Glenn Frey of the Eagles sang about “a girl, my lord, in a flatbed Ford” in the song Take it Easy, Winslow, Arizona was a natural stopping point on old Route 66. In addition to roadside motels, Winslow also boasts one of the best hotels on Route 66 in Arizona: La Posada. During your stay here, Be sure to allow time to visit “Standin’ on a Corner” park, which commemorates the famous song.

La Posada Hotel & Gardens

Rated 9.1/10 on Booking.com

Arguably the grandest hotel on Route 66 in Arizona, La Posada opened in 1930 for guests traveling west on the railroad. It’s been renovated recently and is decorated in a traditional old southwest style, with lots of adobe and Mexican tile. The hotel is surrounded by beautiful gardens and has galleries featuring southwestern art. If you want to treat yourself during your route 66 road trip, this is the place!

Reserve on Booking.com

Earl’s Route 66 Motor Court

hotels on route 66 in Arizona at night with neon lights

Rated 4.9/5 on Google

Earl’s has been locally owned since it opened in 1953. Current owners Blas Sanchez and Angela Archibeque both grew up in Winslow. (Angela worked at La Posada as a teen!) The atmosphere is a cross between retro-motel and grandma’s spare bedroom, which is just how the owners like it. Wonderful old two-tone tile bathrooms and handmade quilts offer a cosy stop in a true relic from bygone days.

Contact the hotel directly for reservations: (928) 224-0161

Looking for other places to stay in Winslow? Check all hotels and compare prices across booking sites with Hotels Combined.

Flagstaff, Arizona Route 66 motels

Flagstaff is the largest of the towns with hotels on Route 66 in Arizona, an as such there are a lot of places to stay here. Over the years many of the wonderful old roadside motels that used to line Route 66 on either end of town have been replaced by modern hotels. They’re all nice places to stay, but they don’t have that retro vibe you might be craving. Fortunately, there are still a few spots that offer that “get your kicks” ambience.

Flagstaff makes a great base if your planning to explore some of the many fabulous Arizona National Monuments nearby, such as Sunset Crater Vocano, Waupatki and Walnut Canyon.

Super 8 by Wyndham Flagstaff

Rated 8.0/10 on Booking.com

Although it’s a chain property, this motel on Route 66 has really gone the extra mile to provide some atmosphere. The well-maintained exterior of the building is clad with wonderful Tudor-style beams and the interior is freshly decorated in earth tones that will have you thinking the Brady Bunch are staying in the room next door. Massive Arizona-themed photos above the bed complete the, er, picture.

Reserve on Booking.com

Little America Hotel

Rated 9.3/10 on Booking.com

A soaring peaked roof with beamed ceiling tucked among the pines give the Little America Hotel a feeling of a western wilderness lodge. The lobby has a chic midcentury design and the rooms have beautiful natural wood slab headboards. This full-service hotel is located just a few hundred yards off Route 66, and its got great atmosphere, so we felt it should be on the list. 😊

Reserve on Booking.com

Looking for other places to stay in Flagstaff? Check all hotels and compare prices across booking sites with Hotels Combined.

Hotels in Williams, Arizona on Route 66

Williams is a wonderful old town on Route 66 that has a combination midcentury/old west feel. Williams is also the closest town to the main entrance of Grand Canyon National Park (which is a scant 50 miles away!). Of all the towns with hotels on route 66 in Arizona, Williams may have the most per capita. The proximity to the park, as well as the many tour operators nearby, makhttps://www.booking.com/hotel/us/rodeway-inn-suites-downtowner-rte-66.en.html?aid=2147336&no_rooms=1&group_adults=2es Williams a good stopover point on your Arizona Route 66 road trip.

The Lodge on Route 66

Motel on route 66 in Arizona with Front porch with bent willow furniture

Rated 8.6/10 on Booking.com

This is a midcentury motor court that’s been updated with 2020s country charm. Rooms are decorated with wood and wrought iron details that would be right at home on a local ranch. The owners have created cosy “living room” in the center of the courtyard, complete with outdoor fireplace. Settle yourself in the bent willow chairs on the front porch alongside a few painted tin roosters and watch Route 66 roll on by.

Reserve on Booking.com


Grand Canyon Hotel

Brick and stucco front of Grand Canyon Hotel on route 66

Rated 8.5/10 on Booking.com

Get a double dose of history when staying at the Grand Canyon Hotel. Opened in 1891, it’s the oldest hotel in Arizona, dating back to the days when Williams was a logging and mining town. It was revitalized when Route 66 became a popular route west. Rooms are furnished with period (mostly Victorian) antiques. Several rooms have lofts and/or bunks, which are great for families.

Reserve on Booking.com

Rodeway Inn & Suites Downtowner

Front of hotel on route 66 in Arizona

Rated 8.2/10 on Booking.com

Come on, with a name like the “Downtowner” don’t you just have to check it out? (Or maybe more accurately, check in?) This classic old motor court on Route 66 is now part of the Rodeway chain, but still retains a lot of unique charm. Rooms have an updated 50’s vibe–think Marilyn & Elvis–and the exterior architecture is right out of “Leave it to Beaver” . . . in a good way.

Reserve on Booking.com


Red Garter Inn

Hotel room with 2 double beds, high ceilings and victorian furniture

Rated 9.1/10 on Booking.com

It’s not every day you get to stay in a former bordello! The Red Garter was built for that purpose in 1895. The building on Route 66 went through several changes before it was reopened–this time as a respectable place of lodging!–in 1994. Victorian-style rooms are named for former “hostesses” and feature period touches, like clawfoot tubs. There is a bakery and cafe downstairs for breakfast and light meals.

Reserve on Booking.com

Looking for other places to stay in Williams? Check all hotels and compare prices across booking sites with Hotels Combined.

Seligman motels on Route 66

No road trip on Route 66 in Arizona would be complete without passing through Seligman, Arizona. Said to be the inspiration for the fictitious town of Radiator Springs from the movie Cars, Seligman is a little slice of road trip nostaligia. Spend the night at one of these cool retro motels, and you might just meet Tow-mater (or a bruuther, or a cuhzin . . . )

Historic Route 66 Motel

Lit up neon sign of Historic Route 66 motel, Seligman Arizona

Rated 8.4/10 on Booking.com

This traditional motel, right on route 66 in Seligman, Arizona channels “Radiator Springs.” The decor of the rooms is pretty classic “motel style,” with some Route 66, automotive, and Harley paraphernalia to spruce it up. Be sure to have a meal in the adjacent Road Kill Cafe (no judgement!)

Reserve on Booking.com

Deluxe Inn

Room at Deluxe Inn Seligman Arizona, showing bed with Route 66 bedspread and Marilyn Monroe photo

Rated 8.5/10 on Booking.com

Who can resist a place with such a swanky name? (Don’t you just wanna say “Dee-luxe”? 😉 ) With it’s geometric sign out front and 50s memorabilia in the rooms–not to mention a Route 66 bedspread–you’ll feel as though you’ve been transported back to 1956 . . . except now there’s A/C and wifi!

Reserve on Booking.com

Looking for other places to stay in Seligman? Check all hotels and compare prices across booking sites with Hotels Combined.

Kingman, Arizona Route 66 hotels

Kingman is the westernmost town with motels and hotels on Route 66 in Arizona where there are places to stay. There are some cool Route 66 Attractions here, including the Arizona Route 66 Museum and the Route 66 Electric Vehicle Museum. Kingman is also only about 75 miles from Hoover Dam, making it a great place to stop for a night or two.

El Trovatore Motel

Midcentury El Trovatore Motel sign, red and white, Kingman, Arizona route 66

Rated 8.1/10 on Booking.com

The El Trovatore is worth a visit just for its signage. Between the giant geometric marker out front and the neon-lit radio-style tower on the bluff behind the original 1937 building, you’ll have no trouble finding it. Themed rooms are decorated in a 50s-glam-hollywood style complete with gold brocade bedspreads. Wowza!

Reserve on Booking.com

Super 8 by Wyndham Kingman

Hotel with 2 double beds, bright yellow walls, large black & white desert murals above beds, route 66 Arizona

Rated 7.1/10 on Booking.com

A little more understated than some of the other hotels on this list, the Super 8 by Wyndham still manages evoke some Route 66 road trip atmosphere. Giant black-and-white desert murals over the bed serve as a reminder of the local terrain, while the neon-yellow color scheme transports you right into midcentury America.

Reserve on Booking.com

Looking for other places to stay in Kingman? Check all hotels and compare prices across booking sites with Hotels Combined.

Which of these fabulous motels and hotels on Route 66 in Arizona would YOU like to stay in on your next trip? It’ll really help get you in the mood!


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Arizona is full of cool small towns. Most were built sometime in the 1800’s as either mining or cattle towns. Because Arizona was so large and sparsely populated, these Arizona small towns needed to be fairly self-sufficient. As a result, they each have a downtown core with terrific old architecture and unique history. Although some of these towns are still bustling with the business that got them started, many have reinvented themselves as tourist destinations that celebrate their heritage.

Each of these Arizona small towns are worth a visit. Some are perfect as a day trip, others make an excellent weekend destination. A few are even worth a longer stay, for use as a base when exploring some of the many natural wonders in the vicinity. Following are a list of 13 of our favorites in different parts of the state:

Prescott Courthouse in background, compass rose on pavement in front, arizona small towns

Northern Arizona Small Towns

Flagstaff

Flagstaff is the largest town in northern Arizona. Old route 66 passes through the southern edge of town, so you definitely get that “classic road trip” vibe. (And there’s a cool Route 66-themed gift shop in the old train station–souvenir alert!). The main part of town has a “nice old fashioned downtown” feel, with historic late Victorian brick buildings housing bars, restaurants and shops. Northern Arizona University is also based in Flagstaff, which means the town is not just a tourist haven.

Tudor-style train station building along railroad tracks

Of all the Arizona small towns, Flagstaff has the highest elevation in the state, at nearly 7,000 feet. Because of this high elevation, Flagstaff is one place in Arizona where you get snow in the winter! (There are ski slopes nearby.) High elevation also means Flagstaff never gets too hot in the summer, which can be refreshing if you’re looking to beat the desert heat. Flagstaff’s location, midway between Grand Canyon and Petrified Forest National Parks, makes it good base for exploring the natural wonders in the northern part of the state.


Kingman

Kingman was established as a railroad town in the 1880s, and soon grew thanks to mining in the surrounding area. Historic Route 66 passes right through town, Kingman is the westernmost Arizona town on the so-called “mother road.” Andy Devine, one of the early stars of western movies, is from Kingman. To celebrate this celluloid hero, the portion of Route 66 that goes trough the center of town is known as “Andy Devine Avenue.”

Today Kingman has a real “road trip” feel, and celebrates its motoring and railroad heritage. The cool multi-purpose Visitor Center is in an old converted power station. You’ll also find the Arizona Route 66 Museum and the Arizona Route 66 Electric Vehicle Museum there. Across the street in Locomotive Park train geeks will love the ogling historic old steam engine #3579. And there is no shortage of Route 66 photo-ops: the logo is displayed all over town on signs and painted on the street.


Seligman

Battered old red tow truck parked in front of building with American Flag painted on side
Is this Seligman . . . or Radiator Springs???

It is because of this little hamlet, bypassed by Interstate 40, that the Route 66 legend lives on. In 1987 locals petitioned the State of Arizona and had it designated a historic highway. This story is said to have inspired the location of Radiator Springs for the movie Cars. Today this no-stoplight town is a pilgrimage for Route 66 fans, who find retro motels, memorabilia shops . . . and lots of vintage cars parked around town (you might even get to meet Tow Mater!)


Williams

Two things distinguish Williams: Route 66 and the Grand Canyon. Williams describes itself as “the best preserved stretch of Route 66.” It was the last town on the “mother road” to be bypassed by Interstate 40 (in 1984), so it really hung on to its Route 66 identity. The center of town, with its diners, motels and shops is a designated National Historic District.

building with statue of cow in front

Williams is also the town nearest to the main entrance of Grand Canyon National Park (about 50 miles due north), which makes it a great base for exploring the area. The town is the headquarters of the Grand Canyon Historic Railway and Hotel. Because of its close proximity to the park, many Grand Canyon tour operators are based in Williams. Kaibab National Forest surrounds the town, with plenty hiking, biking and fishing opportunities for outdoor lovers.


Winslow

For anyone who has ever listened to a Classic Rock radio station and heard the lyrics, “well I’m standin’ on a corner in Winslow, Arizona . . . ” Yep, this is the place! This is one of the small Arizona towns along old Route 66 which has capitalized on the Jackson Browne/Glenn Frey song made famous by the rock group Eagles. Get your 70s rock fix at the park that commemorates “Standing on a corner Winslow Arizona” where there’s even (you knew this was coming!) a flatbed Ford.

Route 66 sign on roadbed, Winslow Arizona

Winslow’s other claim to fame is the La Posada Hotel, one of the original Fred Harvey railroad hotels designed by Mary Colter along the Santa Fe railroad line. Current owners renovated and reopened the southwestern style luxury property in 1997. Today it contains a top-notch restaurant and art gallery in addition to comfy guest rooms. It makes an elegant old-world stopover while cruisin’ Route 66.

PRO TIP: Go retro in Northern Arizona! Stay at one of these cool hotels on Route 66 in Arizona!


Central Arizona Small Towns

Cottonwood

Cottonwood sits alongside the Verde River in the valley just north of Jerome. Due to its location along a river, Cottonwood is unique among small Arizona towns in that it began its life as a farming community in the late 1800s. The cute main street has a midcentury feel. Our first visit to Cottonwood in 2013 showed a town with “good bones” but not a lot going on. However, recent visits show that the town has really come into its own. Shops, cafes and restaurants now fill the once empty storefronts.

Red 1950s car parked in front of vintage gas station Cottonwood Arizona

Cottonwood has stayed true to its agricultural roots. The town’s other draw is the Verde Valley Wine Trail. Rows of grape vines grace the gently sloping hills surrounding Cottonwood. Over 20 wineries and tasting rooms are open for sampling in and around the town.


Globe

Globe was founded in the 1870s on copper mining and cattle, and both are still important industries today. This central Arizona small town is equidistant from Phoenix and Tucson and makes a nice day trip or weekend destination. Take a walking tour of the historic downtown. Visit the Gila County Historical Museum and explore the work of local artists at the Cobre Valley Center for the Arts (housed in the former courthouse).

Sitting in the middle of the Tonto National Forest, Globe is near several native American historic sites, such as the Tonto National Monument (cliff dwellings), as well as Besh Ba Gowah Archaelogical Park. The 3,500-foot elevation transitions between saguaro-filled desert and ponderosa pine forest. Wildflower lovers come to Globe for some spectacular natural displays.


Jerome

Jerome is a unique former copper mining town that’s now a great destination for visitors. Climb up Cleopatra Hill on a single twisty road to get there. As a result, the view of the surrounding valley is spectacular. You can even see many of Sedona’s red rock formations in the distance.

Jerome is an Arizona Victorian small town perched on a mountain, here is the 1898 Hotel Connor with the red rocks of Sedona in the background

Jerome once had so many saloons it was called “The Wickedest Town in America.” Now you can brows in funky shops and wet your whistle at atmospheric bars and restaurants. Planning on whoopin’ it up old-tyme miner style during a night on the town? We recommend staying in one of the cute Bed & Breakfasts. You certainly won’t want to tackle the drive down that mountain late at night.


Prescott

Prescott is charming, an example of Arizona small towns at their best. A classic old courthouse anchors the central square. (Remember the old Back to the Future movies?) Pretty Victorian homes and cottages line the downtown streets. Surrounding the square are restaurants, boutiques, antique shops, cafes and western wear outfitters. Visit historic “Whiskey Row,” so called because that’s where all the “hootin’ & hollerin'” happened. Today you can still do a bit of hootin’ & hollerin’ on Whiskey Row, and get your Western on . . . many of the bars feature live music.

Prescott Courthouse in background, compass rose on pavement in front, arizona small towns
The courthouse in the center of Prescott’s beautiful town square

That western atmosphere is legit: Prescott is also home to the world’s oldest rodeo, with the grounds about a half mile northwest of downtown. Nearby Prescott National Forest and Watson Lake State Park provide plenty of opportunity for outdoor pursuits.


Southern Arizona Small Towns

Bisbee

Street in Bisbee, Arizona with mountain in background
The winding streets of Bisbee, a small town nestled in the Mule Mountains of southeastern Arizona.

Bisbee, Arizona was established in 1876 as copper mining town tucked away in the Mule Mountains southeastern part of Arizona. The mine is no longer operational, but Bisbee has now transformed itself into a cool and funky destination with a sort of “Victorian-meets-Midcentury” kind of vibe.

Learn how copper helped shape both the town⏤and the nation⏤at the Bisbee Mining and Historical Museum, and then see the real deal underground on a Queen Mine Tour. Browse in Bisbee’s many art galleries, and spend the night (or 3) at one of the town’s picturesque bed and breakfasts.


Patagonia

Patagonia is a small town nestled high in the Santa Rita Mountains, about an hour southeast of Tucson. Once a mining town, Patagonia today is focused on cattle ranching and recreation. The wine growing region of Sonoita is just a few miles north.

The Sonoita Creek flows through Patagonia year round (a rarity in Arizona’s dry climate). As a result, the region is a popular flyway for many unique types of birds⏤and is a great spot for birdwatchers. Downtown Patagonia has a few funky art galleries, shops and cafes. The town’s high altitude (4,500 feet) keeps it cool in the summer, and many visitors like to stay for a week, enjoying nearby Patagonia Lake State Park, or ropin’ and ridin’ at the historic Circle Z Ranch.

Tombstone

Stagecoach and horses on the dirt streets of Tombstone, Arizona
It’s hard to get more “Old West” than the small Arizona town of Tombstone, home of the O.K. Corral. (Photo courtesy of AOT)

It would be hard to get more “Old West” in Arizona small towns than Tombstone. This is where the famous “Shootout at the OK Corral” took place with the Earp brothers & Doc Holliday pitted agains the Clanton-McLaury gang. But there’s a lot more to Tombstone, including its rich silver mining history, and clashes with the Apaches.

Tombstone has done much to preserve its Old West atmosphere. The main street is still dirt, and cars have to share the road with horses! There are plenty of western wear shops, restaurants and saloons. Historic sights include the Birdcage Theater and Tombstone Courthouse. But be sure to allow some time to see the “shootout:” it’s re-enacted daily.

Tubac

Tubac is a small Arizona town about 50 miles south of Tucson that today is a thriving artist colony. Unlike most Arizona small towns, the history of Tubac predates mining and cattle. Because of its location along the Santa Cruz River, it was a settlement for native tribes. Many of these native tribes greeted the Spanish Missionaries when they arrived in the late 1600s.

Colorful pottery outside a shop in Tubac, Arizona
Colorful pottery is one of the many types of creative expression available in the artsy small town of Tubac, Arizona. (photo courtesy AOT)

History buffs should visit Tumacacori National Historic Park just outside of town. Here, hundreds of years and layers of history mingle together, incorporating Native Peoples, Spanish Missionaries and Mexican and American soldiers. Tubac’s multiple art galleries line the sleepy streets of Tubac. The Tubac Center of the Arts hosts rotating exhibits, art workshops and performances.

Yuma

Yuma is a small Arizona town in the extreme southwest corner of the state. Sitting along the banks of the Colorado River made Yuma a strategic location in the 18th and 19th centuries. Initially it was missionaries who traveled this route. Passing through Yuma became one of the fastest ways to get out west during the California Gold Rush.

Today visitors to Yuma can get the feel of a real “old west” town by visiting the historic downtown. The center of town really took off during the gold rush years. Yuma was also home to the Yuma Territorial Prison, which is now a state park. (The prison figured largely in the classic Western movie 3:10 to Yuma). Visit the Colorado River State Historic Park to learn about the importance of the crossing throughout the past few centuries.


These Arizona small towns help to tell the fascinating history of the state. They all sit amid Arizona’s fabulous scenery, under those magnificent blue skies. The combination makes them each of them a great destination for a few days’ excursion.

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List of Small Arizona Towns to Visit

  1. Bisbee (southern Arizona)
  2. Cottonwood (central Arizona)
  3. Flagstaff (northern Arizona)
  4. Globe (central Arizona)
  5. Jerome (central Arizona)
  6. Kingman (northern Arizona)
  7. Patagonia (southern Arizona)
  8. Prescott (central Arizona)
  9. Seligman (northern Arizona)
  10. Tombstone (southern Arizona)
  11. Tubac (southern Arizona)
  12. Williams (northern Arizona)
  13. Winslow (northern Arizona)
  14. Yuma (southern Arizona)